TOP QUALITY RESIDENCES And The Chuck Norris Effect

Every medical student is really a bit apprehensive when he/she knows they will be assigned a new resident. Exactly the same questions always appear…will the resident be nice? Will they understand my busy schedule? Will they make me do a ton of scutwork? Will they make me write most of his/her progress notes? And maybe most importantly, will they i want to leave early to review for boards or benefit from the occasional night out? After a year and a half of clinical rotations in a variety of hospitals throughout NYC, I have learned that every resident can fit in to 1 of three general categories.

The Amazing Resident
The first type of resident is my favorite. He/she is the one that still remembers what it’s prefer to have freedom and no responsibility as a 3rd and 4th year medical student. They recognize that the medical student is strictly there to learn some cool things and see some interesting procedures, then escape the hospital to review. This resident is almost always cognizant to the fact that the medical student will not want to work through lunch to finish a progress note that ought to be done by the resident to begin with.

Ki Residences Sunset Way I have also noticed that this type of resident is usually better and smarter than his/her colleagues. He/she has the ability to get their work done with out a medical student, therefore doesn’t have to depend on him for help. Since this resident is normally smarter than the average bear, they often times impart unique clinical knowledge to the student. The funny thing concerning this resident is that I am MUCH more ready to do the lowest of scutwork to greatly help him/her out because of their teaching and understanding of the medical student’s role.

The Horrible Resident
On the other extreme of the spectrum is the resident which makes the student think that if you don’t work longer and harder than the resident, then you will ultimately be considered a horrible doctor and unworthy of the ‘MD’ degree. The darkest of these types of residents will even taunt the medical student’s worst fears by threatening the notion of giving you a bad evaluation if you are not breaking your back to make their life easier. Because of this in the event that you eat lunch before finishing scutwork for him/her despite the fact that you’re about to distribute from hypoglycemia, you’re unworthy. This sort of resident will berate you if anything goes wrong during their shift. This may include yelling at you for misplacing the central line in the carotid as opposed to the external jugular, even though you’re only an observer through the procedure. And for your information, it will continually be your fault, thus it really is easier never to argue and merely accept the blame and declare that you will never do it again.

This sort of resident can either be smart or not so bright, but one thing is always true, their idea of ‘teaching’ is quite misconstrued. They believe making the medical student call another hospital to obtain medical records, or calling the primary care doctor regarding a patient that they know nothing about, falls beneath the category of teaching, Therefore, this fulfills their role as a ‘teacher,’ resolving them of having to waste their time explaining the reasoning for ordering potassium levels Q4H on the DKA patient.

On the other hand, I have to admit that this kind of resident isn’t entirely bad. I once had a resident that often left the building before me leaving some of his work for me to complete. He would ask me to get an ABG on his patient with respiratory distress, and then go back home while I was in the patient’s room. Although this was incredibly annoying, I did become extraordinarily competent on many procedures. I could now do an ABG blindfolded and I don’t need any assistance apart from a nurse to put an NG tube. Thus, I must thank that resident for being a negative teacher and leaving me to understand things on my own.

The Okay Resident
The last type of resident is markedly different than others, but sometimes has traits of both extremes. I really believe the primary problem that undermines this resident is they aren’t aware of the truth that the student has needs such as for example going to the toilet and eating. They have a tendency to forget that the student actually exists and is more than just a fly following them around. This resident is not directly vicious (just like the ‘horrible resident’), it’s that they are usually too overwhelmed throughout the day and just don’t know how to make use of the student effectively. This results in a medical student that is bored and zones out because he/she isn’t engaged and is left to stare at the paint drying on the wall.

I don’t desire to generalize this group of residents as being not smart, but they do not get it like many of their colleagues. The point that they are overwhelmed by work is basically because they don’t discover how to manage their time appropriately so when needed, ask for help from the medical student. I have met quite a few of the residents that are very smart, it’s just that they tend to be thorough making use of their patients, which doesn’t allow any moment for them to think about how exactly to have the student interact. From my experience, it appears that their strict focus on details is due to their paranoia of making a mistake and somehow killing an individual. This leads me to trust they need to read Samuel Shem’s books and grasp the idea that less is normally better in the healthcare world and their meticulousness is hindering instead of helping.